Koroneiki Olives

For generations, my family has grown and harvested a single variety of olive—the Koroneiki Olive.  This olive is small relative to other olives and primarily grown for its oil.  The Koroneiki Olive trees are typically pruned and kept about 20 feet in height and have an open and spreading canopy. This breed belongs to the family Olea europaea, and has been grown in Greece for more than 3,000 years. It’s said the Koroneiki Olive originated in the Messenia region and dates back to ancient times—Homer referred to it in the Iliad as, “liquid gold.”

While drought resistant, it does not tolerate cold temperatures well; hence why it thrives in the hot Mediterranean sun in areas close to the salty sea—like my parent’s villages.  A distinctive trait is the gnarled branching pattern with feather-shaped leaves growing opposite each-other. The skin of the leaf is rich in tannin, and gives the leaf its gray-green appearance once a tree has matured. The spring flower blossoms are cream-colored and fragrant; once a tree begins bearing fruit, it can produce for up to five centuries. Some trees on our property are several centuries old and still yield excellent fruit.

Like grape vines, our trees have been grafted over multiple generations; I can remember planting trees with my grandfather when I was a little boy. The olive oil from the State of Messenia, Greece, is highly sought after for its exquisite taste and flavor.

Tested as Extra Virgin

“Kosta’s Olive Oil was certified as extra virgin by the UC Davis Olive Oil Taste Panel.”The University of California Davis Olive Oil Center (http://olivecenter.ucdavis.edu/who-we-are) recently tested our 2010 and 2011 harvests. We are proud to announce both samples were found EXTRA VIRGIN and the UC Davis “cob-web analysis” demonstrated a very consistent fingerprint (i.e. consistency in our oils taste, quality and attributes).  We were proud to see consistency across different harvest years with similar flavors and quality.  I expected nothing less knowing it’s our land, we know what we put in so, we know what we are going to get out—assuming Mother Nature helps out!

2011 Kosta’s Olive Oil Panelists Results

The UC Davis Olive Oil Taste Panelists found our 2011 olive oil to have “green fruit” notes of green olive and artichoke along with ripe fruit flavors of ripe olive, nutty, buttery, and even ripe banana (similar to our 2010 olive oil).

2010 Kosta’s Olive Oil Panelists Results

The UC Davis Olive Oil Taste Panelists found our 2010 olive oil to have “green fruit” notes of green olive and artichoke along with ripe fruit flavors of ripe olive, buttery, ripe banana, and even some nutty-ness.

Understanding Tasting Terms

The International Olive Council (IOC- http://www.internationaloliveoil.org/) has developed a system for the objective organoleptic (tasting) assessment of olive oil in order to determine an olive oil’s quality. This assessment method is based on panels of trained tasters recognizing the absence and/or presence of specific positive and negative (defective) attributes.

The IOC offers the following terms to help guide one’s tasting experiences.

Source: http://www.oliveoiltimes.com/reference-library/olive-oil-tasting-terms-definitions